Hurricane Fay

 

Hurricane Fay

SPECIAL REPORT:

Tropical Storm Fay not categorised by Bermudian officials as a Hurricane, but it definitely felt like one. Peak winds over 100knots and the visible damage to homes, power outages and uprooting 50ft+ trees surely was reminiscent of Hurricane Fabian. Fay caught the island by surprise like a Mike Tyson uppercut, now we are trying to pick ourselves up from the canvas and another haymaker is raining down on us but we sure hope to not make the same mistake twice with Hurricane Gonzalo fast approaching and set to touch down Friday afternoon.

Masters and Gorhams are starting to look like scenes of the Walking Dead. I wouldn’t say people are panicking but we sure are getting over prepared. Local shops are getting ‘raided’ not to the full meaning of the word but people are flocking to stock up on supplies for Gonzalo and may just be getting caught up in the whirlwind of anticipation for the next system to pass by. Make sure your houses are secure, water dipped and flashlights/lanterns working not just corn curls and twisteds. Take heed to all the warnings especially maritime as no one should be on the water whatsoever. Stay safe Bermuda.

SPECIAL REPORT:

DAY 1 post Fay, I drove to check on family and house damages during the aftermath of Fay. I was quite surprised at the absence of relief forces. I only saw and heard fire trucks tending to distress calls, one police car and luckily no ambulances. Does this sound like enough support? Island wide power outages and damages caused traffic lights to be off causing increasingly dangerous traffic situations. However, I did not see NOT one police officer directing traffic. Why was this the case? I understand people have families, but if you are part of public service to ensure the safety and wellbeing of the citizens, it should not take so long to mobilize- Days! As debris blocked entrances and causing streets to be restricted to one way traffic, drivers had to be on extreme alert and cautious to not cause any greater misfortune. Where was the regiment? Are these events not what are trained for, or should they, if not already? The day of Fay caused major concern in my opinion as Belco seemed to work tirelessly to turn on lights, so that everyone can get back to facebooking and tweeting and let’s not forget their favourite evening show. As I sat in the dark with my family waiting for Belco to turn on the power, I took a moment to reflect and it was a great feeling to be unplugged for the night. You know when you live in the 21st century when lights come on and people are screaming from their houses applauding the success of the engineers. Even the dogs barked in excitement.

The positives from what I saw driving around helping to move debris, that Bermudians came together to help clean up neighbour’s yards, offered food to those who did not have electricity to cook and dipped water for those who couldn’t. In time of crisis that affects the majority we Bermudians seem to do as I have always known Bermudians to do and that is lend a helping hand to those who need it.  Now that Gonzalo is right on our heels, lets continue to stand together because WE ARE BERMUDA!

Recommend0 recommendationsPublished in All Articles, Bermuda Nature, Bermuda People, Bermuda Roads

Related Articles

Responses